Fall 2014 Marathon Training: Take Two

Last week, I wrapped up my first week of marathon training for the Clarence Demar Marathon, and it’s going a little different than I’d originally planned. I’d planned to jump right into Pfitzinger’s 12-Week “50-70 miles per week” plan. I was planning to mainly run general aerobic and recovery miles but with a little more volume. What I didn’t plan on was having to recover from an injury in my first week of training.

I feel like every single season I write a post very similar to this one. In 2013, I had two stress fractures. One in the spring, and one in the fall. Both times, I started training and had to modify everything because of injury. After going through the ringer of MRIs, blood tests, DEXA scans (to rule out osteoporosis), I began a pretty cool supplement program for maximum calcium absorption designed by my smartie pants pharmacist friend, Lauren. So when 2014 rolled around, I was ready. And then, a few days after I began training for Boston, I got the flu. Take two, once again. This time around is no different…and it wouldn’t be marathon training if it started any other way!

I came home from Charlevoix and was ready to go, but I promised myself I would take a week off of running. Anyone who knows me knows that I never do this willingly, so my thought was that a week of much needed rest would help with injury prevention. I was also hoping that a week off and some massage therapy, ART (active release therapy – a post for another day), and ice baths would help kick my plantar fasciitis that I’ve been battling since March. The entire time I was running my marathon, I kept telling myself that and promising my body a rest. I had 2 weeks of downtime in between Charlevoix and training for my first fall marathon so one week of swimming, biking, stretching and resting would be good for me.

Usually, I declare something like this and never follow through. Last year, after my marathon in Alaska, I promised myself the same thing – but made it four days before deciding I should run and explore the Alaskan wilderness. I can’t say I regret that decision…

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Except last year, I couldn’t just stop at a few miles and ended up overdoing it. The result was being sidelined for nearly 5 weeks (8 if you count the time where I was barely running because I didn’t know what was wrong) with a tibial stress reaction. So this year, I stuck to it. I took several days completely off, and did ice baths almost daily. I was stretching, and by the end of the week, strength training and biking again. Maybe I put in too many miles on the bike, or maybe my body needed just a few more days without running. On my first day back out, I strained my calf. I was so confused when it happened. I rested! I took care of myself! Why was this happening?

Well, my first run back was on Monday, June 30th and I was a little to excited to get back out there. I went a little too far and fast for coming off of a break, even though I only took a week off. I’d done a fairly hilly 56 mile ride the day before, and two other decent rides in the days before that. My legs were tired, but not from running. I know better. Thankfully, I was at the Saucon Rail Trail when it happened. It’s a flat, cinder trail – at least I wasn’t trying to run Honeysuckle Road or something. I probably would have completely torn my calf on that.

I got about three quarters of the way through my run when I felt a sharp twinge in my calf and the whole thing felt like it seized up. I stopped immediately, recognizing the pain from a small hamstring strain I had earlier this year before the Columbia marathon. When I felt the tell tale pain in my calf, I didn’t take another step, even knowing I was still 2.3 miles from my car. I massaged the area, and walked to see if it was just a cramp. There was a water fountain, so I took in some fluids and started to stretch a little. Ow. Stretching was excruciating. After about 10 minutes of frustration, I tried to take another step running – ow. So I started walking, which didn’t feel good but didn’t result in the same alarming feeling running produced.

About 10 minutes of walking and I was bored and cranky. I tried running again- slowly – and it was okay for about a minute. I continued the run walk pattern until I ended up back at my car. The rest of the day was spent icing, elevating, compressing and taking some ibuprofen. As I’ve said before, I don’t like taking NSAIDs, but I thought it was the best way to get down any initial inflammation. There was no visible inflammation or bruising, but as the day went on walking became more of a chore. I kept a calf sleeve on it, went to bed that night and hoped for a miracle. No miracle – but it certainly felt significantly better in the morning. Not better like I should go run a marathon, but I was walking fine. The following day, I tried running. I made it one slow mile when I started to run with a limp and feel uncomfortable. I stopped, knowing I did enough and more miles would be pointless and unnecessary. After an afternoon session with my massage therapist, Mary Fitzgerald, I was feeling a lot better. The next day, same thing: one mile. This time, faster, but I felt like I’d hit my limit at the one mile mark. Still, it was progress. I felt better.

The whole thing was still bugging me, so I went to the doctor just to be on the safe side. I like Dr. Krafczyk at OAA, but he was unavailable so I saw Dr. Laura Dunne, who I used to see before I met Krafczyk. I wanted to confirm that it was, in fact, a calf strain and that what I was doing to treat it was on point. Dunne has seen me through several injuries, and she told me she was relieved to confirm my suspicion and thought she was going to see me with a completely torn calf muscle. I’m glad I stopped when I did, because it could have easily turned into that. She cleared me to run – I was supposed to run a four mile road race the next day and she encouraged me to do it. I opted to stay home because I didn’t want to chance racing it and tearing it.

Instead of racing, I went out solo and made it three glorious miles. I finally felt like I could keep going – but I still made myself stop at three. I was just happy to make it past the one mile mark and though I wasn’t at the point where I was running with a limp, I didn’t want to chance it. I made it six miles the next day at a decent pace, but felt a little tired towards the end. I opted to rest it on Sunday and start the week fresh on Monday morning. Biking really seemed to aggravate it, so I stayed out of the saddle the entire week it was bugging me.

What did I really expect? Seven marathons (six PRs), a half-Ironman, and some awesome shorter distance races since the end of November. My body wanted some rest and gave me a warning sign. I am still following my trusty Pfitz plan, but I chose a different level to allow my body to ease back into training. I only ran a total of 27 miles last week, and the first few days were not the most comfortable. My legs felt heavy. I felt tired. But as the week wore on, I started to feel like it was coming back. By Saturday, I ran the Belmar 5 Miler and PR’d (more on that later) but I had to work pretty hard for it. I felt every single day of my two week hiatus on that run.

My last marathon still feels like it was a dream. I did it on tired legs – it was my last race of a very long (but fun) season. I am confident that I have more in me. Right now, it’s more important not to ignore warning signs and to give my body the recovery it needs and do some real training. So here’s to two months of rebuilding mileage, track workouts, tempo runs, and shorter distance racing!

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8 thoughts on “Fall 2014 Marathon Training: Take Two

  1. charissarunning July 16, 2014 / 9:41 am

    Congrats on your 5-mile PR!! Can’t wait to read about it 🙂

    I’m sorry you have to deal with this injury. I am wishing for the speediest of recoveries to you! How many marathons do you have coming up in the fall? Maybe you can make this next marathon more like a warm-up marathon for your later season ones? That way you really get to focus on recovery the next couple weeks without the worry of trying to PR for it.

  2. Jason July 21, 2014 / 10:43 am

    That is a great looking elevation chart for your fall marathon! Looks like a PR course to me 🙂

    • allisonfiorini July 21, 2014 / 11:04 am

      Lol if I can get my calf under control I think it will be a nice course to try for a PR! I’m still struggling with pushing the pace and not reinjuring myself! I’m getting impatient!

      • Jason July 21, 2014 / 11:46 am

        ha! be patient, it’ll happen 🙂

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